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producer

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Day 2 of Filming Uncovering Eden

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At 5:00am I woke up with butterflies in my stomach. I knew that this was the biggest day of filming because of how many people would be involved in the shoot.

Thankfully my Assistant Director, Toro Adeyemi, showed up at the apartment at 12:30am to help me the following day… and to rag on me in any way possible because she’s my close friend and I lived with her for 3 horrible years.

We arrived at a local private school and was let in by an amazing employee, coincidently named Darren, who stayed with us all day as we worked with about 20 or so extras plus our cast and crew.

The first scene we shot was in the hallway of the school lined with blue lockers and amidst fellow students. I kept my ensemble cast in a holding room until I was ready to bring them to set to start choreographing them. Once I blocked out my lead actors, Victoria, Marrick, David and Julia, I had my AD bring down groups of students at a time. In order to make this work, I needed to make sure that everyone knew where they were going to end up: some starting down the hall and walking to a classroom, others grabbing books by their lockers and mingling with classmates.

After my cinematographer, Jason, and I framed up the shot, piecing together how the ensemble would interact with others came together with a few run-throughs.

We had two hallway scenes to work out, one that is early on in the story and another leading up to the climax.

The second hallway scene actually leads into another shot in a classroom. With the jib, Jason and I were able to connect these two scenes with some amazing movement. I think our entire crew would agree that the shot where we follow Edie from the door all the way to her seat is pretty amazing, visually.

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After that, we headed to a small library on location where we see Edie interacting with June, Chad and Darren. We also get to see how mean June is to other students… for a 16-year-old, Julia Sismour blew me away with her acting ability. She is completely captivating to watch and plays to June’s cruel nature. The way that David Laws plays Chad is equally impressive. Chad is June’s right hand man and needed to be very loud in character with not many lines. I chose David because he is excellent at adding little touches to his characters to bring them to life… in this case, his body language and the presence of a hair comb as his prop is pretty fascinating to watch… Trust me, you will understand when you see the film.

Marrick and Victoria’s on-screen chemistry felt so real that some of our crew couldn’t figure out if they were rehearsing or flirting with each other. Either way, they looked great on camera, even for some of our darkest scenes. Both Victoria and Marrick are actors who ask many questions about their characters in order to truly become them. Victoria is wonderful at putting herself emotionally into a scene and channeling inner struggle. I am very glad that I chose them to play these roles.

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Our last scene of the day was on a school’s unused baseball field. Originally we were going to have this scene on some school bleachers, but couldn’t get permission to use any. If there is one thing I’ve learned about filmmaking, it’s always to have a Plan B. In this case, the baseball field actually worked out better visually and we were all very happy at how it turned out.

I find that as a filmmaker, I can’t always get the perfect location, but there is always a way to make it work. In fact, I didn’t have a location for the school until a week or so before we needed to film. I had contacted about 15-20 schools and people either didn’t get back to me, said no, or it was too expensive to use.

…Remember, there is always a way to make a scene work!

That said, I can’t wait for this weekend to film the rest of my story and I will be posting more behind the scenes photos on our Facebook Page and Twitter.

chelsealogotrans

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Budget?! What Budget?! – How to Make a Film with the Bare Minimum

So you’ve written a script. Congratulations. Now it’s time to face the realities of production, namely your budget or lack thereof.

For the longest time I thought that making a quality short film or video would take money to produce, but it turns out that that’s not necessarily true.

Did you know that many cinematographers get their big break by making music videos? Usually, music video production is on a very VERY tight budget by industry standards and this forces cinematographers to be… shall we say, crafty?

If you can only afford fluorescent bulbs and work lights, you tend to be more creative than someone with a lot of luxury cash for extra coffee with the producers.

Production companies and scouts looking for the next big talent notice those who are particularly savvy in this regard. It’s impressive to find directors and cinematographers who can showcase how talented they are without gigantic light setups and full frame cameras. Those people are the triple threats. Strive to be one of them.

That said, you can do a lot of amazing things with little or no money in turning your short script into a reality.

When I made my short film, Flutter, I had nothing. Zip. Nadda… ok, I had 30 bucks toward prop food and pizza, but that’s still basically nothing.

What did I have? - Awesome people who knew what they were doing. I happen to own a Canon 7D (insert Canon endorsement here) and that is a more than adequate camera with the right lenses… perhaps you have friends who will let you borrow?

I also had friends who were part of film clubs and classes who had rental access to lights and shoulder mounts FOR FREE. Usually educational clubs and university departments are more than willing to help you make a project if it allows other students to ‘learn’ from the production experience. MILK THIS FOR ALL IT’S WORTH. There’s no need to feel guilty if everybody wins.

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So what about your location and cast? Do a few screen tests of your friends! Leave a few flyers in your city’s film office! Try Craigslist! Hold a bake sale!! Kick in the doors of your neighbors and ask them… no, TELL them that you will be filming in their house and that you will respect their place and offer them film credit and a slice of your aforementioned Pizza.

Trust me, you can accomplish a lot with (at least) a 30-dollar budget.

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See?! Watch the trailer for my film! HERE.

chelsealogotrans

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